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20130121
20130121
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Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
as it was four years ago. make sure you know that what we are celebrating is not the election or swearing in of a president, what we are doing is celebrating each other. and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home. and after we celebrate, let's make sure to work as hard as we can to pass on an america that is worthy, not only of our past, but also of our future. god bless you. i love you. we will see you tomorrow. [applause] ♪ ["we take care of our own"] ♪ ♪ ["only in america"] ♪ >> as part of our inauguration fightge, the u.s. army's and drum corps -- they will escort president obama down pennsylvania avenue during the inaugural parade. ♪ [drum line] >> it began in april with the production team. it prepares the materials, the music, the drill that we do. parade marching does not require quadrilles, but we do a great deal of research with 18th-century music portrayed on modern instruments that aren't -- that are reminiscent of instruments during the revolutionary war. the rangers a range of vignettes -- are arranged vignettes music from the 18th century that has m
we're celebrating is not the election or swearing-in of a president. what we're doing is celebrating each other. and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home. and after we celebrate, let's make sure to work as hard as we can to pass on an america that is worthy not only of our past but also of our future. god bless you guys. i love you. we'll see you tomorrow. [ applause ] ♪ >> the president of the united states, with the first lady and the vice president and the second lady over at the national building museum here in washington. the festivities only just beginning. getting ready for the big inauguration tomorrow. piers morgan is getting ready to take over our coverage. great to have you here on the national mall. >> very exciting. i have never done an inauguration before. incredibly exciting. i was struck there by the body of the language. seems very relaxed man and comes from being re-elected and facing another great, historic day, a man much more at ease than perhaps the nerve last time. >> four years as president and now another four years and he was elected pretty
is not the election or swearing in of a president. what we're doing is celebrating each other and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home. after we celebrate let's make sure to work as hard as we can to pass on an america that is worthy not only of our past but also of our future. god bless you guys. i love you. we'll see you tomorrow. [ applause ] >> the president of the united states with the first lady and the vice president and the second lady over at the national building museum here in washington. the festivities only just beginning. getting ready for the big inauguration tomorrow. piers morgan is getting ready to take over the coverage. >> very exciting. i've never done on a inauguration before. i'm struck by the body language of the president. he seems a very relaxed man. he looks a man much more at ease with himself than the nerves and stuff that came last time. >> four years as president and now another four years. he was reelected pretty impressively. i think that brings a sense of self-confidence and you can see that coming through. >> it won't be the same huge crowds
it that necessarily in your face but he was standing by some things he felt he got elected on but how will it be perceived? some republicans have already said they are not happy. >> he was direct, blunt, and aggressive. this was an address where the president said i won the election, and i am be aggressive in the second term to push my agenda. republicans will not be happy. democrats will be fired up about the idea high could be a bit more aggressive the second term than in the first term. folks on the left are happy he got health care reform done. that he got the stimulus. a lot of democrats believe he did not go hard enough against the republicans in the first time. to become the first president to use the word "gay" in an address or to defend entitlement programs at a time when everyone in washington is talking about debt and deficits, he threw down the gauntlet and made clear, i won the election, i will stand for these following things. he did not go in great detail. he does that next month. he made clear he is coming out where he is and he will come out swinging and he thinks he
to washington, you already paid for it. well, this is the day they all voted for. and this country elected this president, elections matter, everyone who went to the polling place went to the trouble of getting involved in this campaign. it's getting the reality of it to come true today. i am curious, i know the president is committed to do something about public safety. we can see that in his heart since newtown. we know he wants to do something on immigration because the there to be fixed and both parties want to deal with it fur all kinds of reasons. i'm waiting to see if there's a halfton in his speech today, something about rebuilding this country. i think this president's instincts are good on war and peace. i hope they are good about building this country. i wish the labor unions and all kinds of people would get out to say, let's do what we did when eisenhower was president, a moderate republican. build this country up, rebuild our highways, our bridges, our big cities and transit systems, inner city transportation, really build up this country with jobs. all this talk about debt,
at 12:01 or thereabouts, everyone in the process will be looking to their next election except for the president. so his clock moves faster than anyone els as he looks broader and farther, everyone else with a stake in the system will be looking narrower and more closely at their next election. so it'll be very tough. there's also the mathematical reality reality. four more years and the hardest job in the world means you have four more years of incredibly different problems. i promise you when we watch his successor drive up pennsylvania avenue in four years, we'll be talking about something we will not mention today. some unforeseen crisis. >> andrea mitchell what are you looking for over the next four years? >> you have a president who is actually energized by a feeling of possibilities. i think the way he took on guns that whole issue, that was not discussed at all during the campaign. he responded to the crisis. one of his opponents, ted cruz, the new tea-party supported senator said on "meet the press" yesterday, well he exploited it within minutes. t
, you know, president obama is now won election twice with over 5%, 50% of the vote, which is, you know, he is, he and joe biden, those only two offices everybody votes for. and he has won. he got over 50%. so he will make his case. i think what is different, what is significantly different, there will be confrontation but i think the first time you're seeing the president move hess campaign organization, we just saw this in the last few days, move it into advocacy on the issues for his agenda during the second term. that's unprecedented. no president's ever been able it do that. and this time it is not with some rinky-dink campaign organization that we've seen in the past. this is the biggest campaign organization ever seen in the united states. 28, 30 million people. those people making the case to their members of congress regardless of party, whether the member is democrat or republican. i think could change the way we look at a lame duck second term presidency because of the power of that grassroots organization. bill: wow! that's a big statement, joe. back to the initial question
beginning for him because the first time around, he was elected based on what he promised to do. and this time around, he feels he was elected on what he has done and what he can do in the years to come. and there, you're looking, again, at the president's church. and, george, i wonder what you were thinking this morning when you woke up, about this day because it is a day that gives a president we know a chance to start again, for the country. >> everything stops. everything is new for at least a moment. and he has that clear shot to speak to the entire country. and it feels like the one day where the entire country has ears to hear what the president has to say, as well. >> and one we can show the world also listening. we can show the world that after a hard-fought election, a bruising time in congress, that we are still together in this country. and i believe we have jon karl, white house correspondent, with us. he is also there on the west side of the capitol. jon? >> reporter: diane, i'm here. the divisions, the president will be surrounded, of course, by family and friends
. and if there had been no candidate goldwater in 1964, there would have been no president-elect ronald reagan in 1980. it was goldwater who proved his famous time for choosing television address which made him a political star overnight and led to his running for governor of california and eventually president of these united states. david recounts how bill rusher shore up the goldwater committee when money ran short and spirits sagged. skillfully guided young americans for freedom in his early chaotic days and forced some order and discipline on the blind spirits who ran the "national review," expanded the conservative movement through the tv program the advocates, his newspaper column and lectures and champion ronald reagan when other conservatives were somewhat skeptical about the actor turned politician. bill loved american politics, traveling to distant land, and national review's effervescent edit her bill buckley of whom he once said, quote, the most exasperating people in the world are so often the most beloved and he is no exception. david frisk has captured this and more in his sple
"the five" thinks about it. this is a moment you predicted on election day what happened. what are your thoughts overall? >> bob: as a progressive, a great populist speech. it would remind me of what taft would have said and huey long would have said. it is a -- for those of us on the left, it was a reaffirming speech. it was one that, where he underscored what he has been saying all along. there is a place for government. government does help a lot of people get places. we don't agree on that obviously, but -- >> dana: do you think that has s what he has been saying all along? if you compare the 2008 speech to this one, it's the same? >> bob: what i would say in this without sour grapes. in 2008 he tried to break across the gridlock and he didn't get anywhere so now he will go alone. >> eric: a lot of people on the right said he thinks he has a mandate because he was re-elected. his speech sounded like i have a mandate for the next term, the next four years. he talked about gay rights and climb change. weeping entitlement off the table. equal pay and immigration. those are things we'll
. the next two flags are the flags the u.s. adopted when the president elect's home state became part of the u.s. the middle flag represents the 50 states. president obama plus home state illinois entered the union and 18 -- in 1818, making it the 21st state to join the union. the two flags towards the center, they will display 21 stars. dole in new york, the independent line. -- joel in new york, the independent line. >> i love c-span. inauguration day is a proud day for every american, regardless of party affiliation. i want to address the first caller about poverty. i am a second-generation american, and if you cannot make in this country, you'll be doomed to failure in any other country. host: julie, salt lake city, good morning. caller: i want to thank you for taking my call. i lived in a completely republican state. thank goodness that president obama has prevailed, because i do believe that the majority of people, even though i do it in a republican state, a lot of them did vote for him. unfortunately, i wish we would get rid of the electoral vote and go to the popular vote. i
, chuck schumer of new york and newly elected republican senator ted cruz of texas. welcome back as senator cruz to "meet the press." back to both of you. i want to start on the gun debate. because as i say, even before the second term is officially underway thissy is bait is well underway. here are the highlights of what the president wants to accomplish. universal background checks. he'd like to pursue a ban on high capacity magazines. an assault weapons ban that lapsed in 2004. and he'd like stricter laws on gun trafficking. but senator schumer, just as i challenged wayne lapierre of the nra very hard when this came up, i challenge you as well with a question of, is this really going to make a difference? and rich lawry wrote something that caught my attention in "the national review." no one can write a law against mothers owning guns that one day might be turned against them by deranged sons who then commit horrific acts of murder-suicide. shooting rampages are hard to prevent because they are so often committed by young men with no criminal records who want to die. these ar
election, for example, i think the most racially divisive comment of the entire election was joe biden's comment where he said if the republicans win, they are, quote, going to put y'all back in chains. that made my heart weep to see a sitting vice president playing to racial fears and playing on those issues. i think that's unfortunate. i don't think it has any place in politics. >> chuck hagel, you were very tepid on "meet the press" a couple of weeks ago. >> i was. >> now you've met with him, you're more comfortable, you'll support him? >> i am. >> what changed? >> i said on your show that i had real concerns. i spent 90 minutes with him. i asked him very specific questions on the things that troubled me. his answers were forth right. and they were answers that alayed my concerns. should we keep every option on the table to prevent a nuclear iran? yes. i went further. i said, do you think we can tolerate a nuclear iran? he said no. and i said to him, well, then, if we had to use military as the only choice, would you? he said yes. second, i asked him hezbollah and hamas, should they
to be a watchdog. i used to say, what start in a lap dog. so that in changing the election of the commission, and even though later we were able to get some traction push the door, growing out of the 2000 election, the voters election, the commission has never been the same since that time. so reagan in the sense succeeded in making in the body that could not listen to ordinary people or that would not listen to ordinary people. not independent. they kept trying. the commissioners felt like they should just endorse whatever the administration felt. if you're going to do that, people appointed political appointees all over government his job is to do that. your job is to monitor them. right now all those other suppression activity that took place all across the country in the whole big debate about it, the civil rights commission should have been at the center of that debate based on its history, its experience with floating and voting rights suppression and making recommendations. it was nowhere to be seen. and so what it has done is subverted the mission that was supposed to have. what it n
of the strength of how his legacy will continue it will actually be the 2016 election that will tell us. if you look at history only if a person of the same party is elected after that to turn president that the policies of that present a continue to get in grain and truly part of the cultural fabric. the republican is elected in 2016 you will see some dismantling of certain things. the saw with george bush after ronald reagan. it does not happen very often in history. there's not much of a crowd left at all. matter where you figure in politically you cannot argue that president obama is an incredible writer an incredible speaker. very much appreciated around these parts. folks now moving on to the next stage of this. it is along pennsylvania avenue. the parade they're looking forward to. the first family finishes that quick lunch. about 45 minutes. all of that food that is making me so hungry earlier in our coverage. they arrived very early this morning. kind of like we did here at the national mall for our coverage. they brought along with them some young people from around chicago. that is
party and here for an election celebration. he misspoke and said, you know, i am happy to be the president of the united states or something like that. jumping the gun a little bit. officials from south carolina and new hampshire. just want to mention that. who knows what the field will look like in a couple of years. a broad overview. not looking backwards but looking forward. giving the grand vision. perhaps, mentioning some of the issues he wants to tackle. gun control, deficit reduction. as you said, waiting on the big details until the state of the union address. neil: you mentioned finding common ground. we may have gotten a hint on that when republicans said they would look at eight debt ceiling it ascension back ago, probably, three months. what do you make of that? don: they would be blamed, roundly, thoroughly if the country went into some kind of default. the strategy, as you have been reporting, has been to try to take this issue off the table and then fight the battle over spending cuts when you have a sequestration cuts scheduled to start march 1. the curr
in election in two years. >> this and other difficulties appeared miles away as mr. obama recited the constitutional oath that cemented the start of his new term. >> i did it. >> sasha was referring to the mix jum four years ago where the chief justice and the president said some of the words of the oath out of sequence prompting a do-over here at the white house a couple of hours later. as sasha said nobody messed up this time and as said a couple of moments ago, that's probably not too bad. >>> robert gibbs was an adviser to the obama campaign and served as the white house's first press secretary. welcome. >> thank you. >> you have seen it you have read it, characterize it. >> i think it's hopeful, and it talks about the values and the visions and the ideals that bring us to this very moment as america. you'll hear the president talk a lot about what we have to do in this country together to make progress on the big challenges that we face. and, look, it's not just -- one party can't solve these issues. not even just those in government can tackle these
. maybe roosevelt and hoover an example of that. franklin roosevelt had been elected by a landslide in 1932 over president hoover who was considered to be responsible for the great depression and roosevelt was a great schmoozer. finally, they reduced to looking at the super structure of thing it was the commerce department that was being built and roosevelt said, lovely steel. that was sort of the end of the conversation. the rest of the ride they went in silence. this happens much too often, but not on a second term. >> and david gregory, about a two-mile drive. >> and you remember in the modern era, george w. bush -- the language plate is -- >> yeah, the license plate just for a second here is a story. it's a -- kind of a protest legal local license plate here in washington, d.c. taxation without representation. the president has opted to use them on all the limousines. >> and that always comes up for presidents. >> d.c. has a delegate, a nonvoting member of congress. >> george w. bush met president clinton and they got along famously. they were swapping stories and how bush raise
having been re-elected, having been reaffirmed by the american people in the role as the first family in an odd way we were voting on them as first family. and the american people said, you know what? we may disagree with him on policy and we don't trust him on social security, whatever, but we kind of like that family. we kind of trust that family, and that's -- >> how did they do it? >> by working very hard at being normal. >> right. >> as joy said, stylish, but normal. and i think to see them so comfortable now is a reflection not only of them but of the country. whatever else you want to say, whatever other arguments we're going to have about entitlements, about war, about medicare, about medicaid, it's not going to be about having an african-american first family because they have done it so beautifully. and by the way, to have walked the tightrope of race the way they have, having come up as baby boomers in the affirmative action era when people thought, hey, wait a minute, maybe they don't deserve it, they've got to prove themselves, barack and michelle have proved themselves i
elected by the people is being sworn in to office. just before noon at the capitol, barack obama will take the oath for his second term as president. this is a ceremonial swearing-in because the constitution requires the president to be sworn in on january 20th, and this year the 20th fell on sunday. so the president took the official oath in private yesterday in the blue room at the white house. the oath administered by the chief justice john roberts, jr. the public swearing-in and all the pomp and circumstance that go with it were put off until today and what a day it is. the temperature right now is in the high 30s. the sky is clear, a brilliant winter's day in the nation's capital. people are pouring into the national mall to witness a day of history. the first family began the day by attending services at st. john's church. that's right across the street from the white house. that's a long-standing tradition for presidents on inauguration day. joining me now in our cbs coverage is bob schieffer, our chief washington correspondent and anchor of ""face the nation."" bob, what
confident from his re-election. some might use the word cocky, and that he has become more partisan and more hard nosed. would you agree with that sae assessment? >> and is it by necessity or choice? >> no, i think he's become -- he's practical. and if the other side is going to take a position that they're going to oppose you on every initiative, you have to seek national support. in a democracy, people push policy forward not the politicians and so that's a lesson that he has drawn from the first term. that said, as far as i can -- as i know, and as i know him, his door is always open to people who are willing to work together to solve problems and one hopes in the next four years there will be a spirit of cooperation. understand we're never going to agree on anything. that's why we have two parties. in order to move the country forward we have to move together. >> david axelrod, always good to see you. >> good to see you, savannah. >> i know you'll be watching. we will have more on the second inauguration, but first natalie morales has a check of the other top stories. good morning. >> go
, with republicans here in washington, since his re-election, certainly the way he handled the fiscal cliff and i want to point to a clip of the president and his press conference earlier this week. take a look: >> president barack obama: they have suspicions about social security. they have suspicions about whether government should make sure that kids in poverty are getting enough to eat. >> chris: now we learn that the president is taking his campaign organization and transforming it into an issue advocacy group, organizing for action. is it fair to say that the president has given up on the inside game of negotiating here in washington and is much more interested in bringing outside pressure to bear on the people up on capitol hill. >> chris, you have to do both and i think that is a lesson from the first four years, you can't do one or the other. and i think we'll continue and, listen, the fiscal cliff deal you talked about, we have just about every republican senator who voted for this. we have cut taxes with the republicans and cut spending with the republicans and democrats, on evaluatbvi
was the campaign manager for the obama re-election campaign. his role as significant as anybody, perhaps, in helping to make this day a reality for those who supported the president over the course of the last year. messina will now be running that vast array of names, list of names and supporters that the president has been able to take advantage of as they try to use that lift to help pursue some of his initiatives including an effort to pursue gun control in the weeks and months ahead. matt? >> as we take a look here, we now know that this inauguration day is under way in earnest. vehicles departing from the white house where they'll have a quick coffee with the bipartisan leadership as well as the lead organizers on this day with senator schumer. as you said, no question this job changes a person. having been president now for four years. >> they talk about the change that some close advisers and friends have seen of president obama, in the article it talks about the man who wanted to change the nature of washington now actually warns job candidates that it's hard to get anything don
takeover of the house back in the 1994 elections, speak to what you advise republicans to do in dealing with the president? because he's going to come out saying it's all the republicans fault they won't work with me. >> first of all shall every republican should take the two quotes you've given them tonight. post them on their website, every single house and senate republican and say i am very impressed with this earlier vision of barack obama. i think that he had it right. it's unpatriotic, it's immoral, it is wrong and therefore, i'm going to do my part and my role to make sure that we fix it. now, i would love to see every house republican go to the house right at the center of the capitol, in the rotunda, is a copy of the mag na carta, 1215, almost 800, 900 years ago, in 1215, the nobles said to the king, you cannot spend money that we don't approve raising and the king was in a weak position and said, yes. and all of the legislative branch rose out of that historic moment and the legislature has every right to say we're not going to pass and we're not going to give you the money a
as really engineered the republican takeover of the house back in the 1994 elections, speak to what you advise republicans to do in dealing with the president? because he's going to come out saying it's all the republicans fault they won't work with me. >> first of all shall every republican should take the two quotes you've given them tonight. post them on their website, every single house and senate republican and say i am very impressed with this earlier vision of barack obama. i think that he had it right. it's unpatriotic, it's immoral, it is wrong and therefore, i'm going to do my part and my role to make sure that we fix it. now, i would love to see every house republican go to the house right at the center of the capitol, in the rotunda, is a copy of the mag na carta, 1215, almost 800, 900 years ago, in 1215, the nobles said to the king, you cannot spend money that we don't approve raising and the king was in a weak position and said, yes. and all of the legislative branch rose out of that historic moment and the legislature has every right to say we're not going to pass and we'
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)